• “Systems of Privilege” as a Lens for Black Panther, Parkland, #MeToo, or…

    The news of the death of Allan G. Johnson, path-breaking sociologist, was a punch to my gut. Most writing instructors have go-to authors whose foundational ideas become the central analytical lens of a course. For exa...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Changing the Conversation

      I have been talking with my students about the integral role that writing plays in building community and practicing democracy. Our discussions have followed the mapping exercise I described in my last blog en...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • Curing the “Grading All the Things” Blues

      We’re at that point in the semester when students are hitting Maximum Anxiety about Grades. The corollary for instructors is Maximum Anxiety about Grading All The Things. Here’s a cure for both ill...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Writing, Rhetoric, and Activism

      I have been talking with my students about the school shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School last month, and we have discussed and debated the rhetoric around the murder of 17 students and educators – ...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • Discuss Student Debt in our Writing Classes? Our Students Can’t Afford for Us Not To

      Economics has risen above its reputation as the "dismal science,” but it still may not seem like a lively topic for a composition classroom. However, in the spirit of inviting our students to grapple wit...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • The Power of Image and Text

      I often discuss with students the rhetorical power of using both images and text to help readers understand the nature and stakes of a given problem, and to move readers to action. Civil rights activists have ...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • A Poet’s Prose: Lessons in Slow Reading and Slow Writing from Claudia Rankine

    As another semester begins, I offer praise for a "less is more" approach in the classroom. In particular, teaching fewer readings than you might usually assign, and teaching them slowly, can allow students to practice...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Making Privilege Visible in the Age of #MeToo

      Students came into class today on fire about the latest news of powerful men who have been fired for sexually predatory behaviors. Part of the conversational aftermath of the #metoo movement is the reminder th...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • “Nudge" your Composition Students with an Award-winning Theory

      Why invite an economic theorist into your composition class? Recent Nobel Prize winner Richard Thaler offers concepts that bolster what you already teach in your course about the craft of persuasion, but ...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Connecting Multimodalities and Civic Engagement

    I have been reflecting upon and writing about the ways that using photography (i.e., photovoice) and digital storytelling help open up spaces for students to develop a sense of agency and to be more civically engaged....
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • Learning Methods of Inquiry from MacArthur Grant Winner Nikole Hannah-Jones

    Like many of Nikole Hannah-Jones’ longtime admirers, I was thrilled to hear the New York Times investigative reporter won a 2017 MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” for her culture-shifting analytica...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky