• Talking Science with Non-Scientists in the Anthropocene

    I have been talking with my students about how we talk about science, particularly as non-scientists. After all, whether or not they understood the fine details of climate science, energized students from our campus a...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Reading — Slow and Fast — in the Writing Classroom

    I’ve been teaching writing for 28 years, and I still wrestle with how much reading to assign in a writing class. Hopefully, I'm not alone. There’s an alchemy between “less is more” if we want s...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Listening for Pluralism in Political Dialogue

      As we head into summer, we should invite our students to practice all the skills they’ve honed in our writing classrooms as they listen to the political dialogues unfolding this season. Let’s hope ...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • “Anyone? Anyone?”: Tips for Better Classroom Conversation

    “Now: What questions do you have?” I heard a colleague ask this of her students, midway through a class I was visiting, and I was struck by the helpfulness of the phrase. Rather than asking, “Any que...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Beyond the Parlor: How do Students Find their Voices in Academic Conversation?

    I have a tender spot for students who struggle to find their tone as they enter an academic conversation. I remember writing my first (terrible) essay in college with no idea how to assert my heartfelt (and weak) clai...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Midwinter Mojo: Intentionality in the Classroom

      This is the scene outside my campus office right now. The phrase “bleak midwinter” comes to mind while I dwell on the absurdity of typing “Spring 2019” on my syllabi. No matter the weat...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • From Margin to Center: The Politics of Readers and Syllabi

    While many of us are hurtling toward the end of the semester, we are also pressed to decide next semester’s book orders and ancillary readings. So, I want to celebrate how many of you are blogging about ass...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Middle Ground: Reflections on Conversations and Empathy

    I have been teaching my students to think about academic writing and argument as a conversation, a metaphor which incorporates many of the characteristics I associate with civil discourse: empathy, listening, compassi...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • Journaling toward Growth Mindsets during Midterms

        “Midterm anxiety” conjures up a medley of worries. I’m not talking about midterm elections (another topic, another blog), but midterm grades. For first-semester writers, in particular,...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Critical Questioning for Civic Writing

        I continue to think about the ways I can use my rhetoric and writing class as a space where my students can develop the skills they need to be civically engaged and connect what they think and write to ...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • Webs of Fear, Webs of Fascination

    A week ago, I would have cringed, ducked (and maybe even shrieked) at the image on the left, captured recently by a skillful neighbor.   This fall, though, I’m a brand-new student in an evening Master Nat...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Citizenship and the Value of Stillness

    While canvassing my neighborhoods as a candidate for the local school board, I ended up discussing with a parent the difference between reading on a screen and reading a book. It’s reasonable to think about the ...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • On the Pleasures of School Supplies (and Self-Reflection)

    If you’re reading this, I’ll bet you get a kick out of new school supplies. Those of us who teach tend to enjoy the tools of the trade. Sharing our enthusiasm for those tools – even throw-back ones l...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Summer Reading, Assigned by Your Students

    The end of the semester often brings to mind Crystal Eastman’s 1920 essay, “Now We Can Begin.” Like any Commencement speaker worth her salt, Eastman, a feminist and pacifist, chose the momentous occa...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • “Systems of Privilege” as a Lens for Black Panther, Parkland, #MeToo, or…

    The news of the death of Allan G. Johnson, path-breaking sociologist, was a punch to my gut. Most writing instructors have go-to authors whose foundational ideas become the central analytical lens of a course. For exa...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Changing the Conversation

      I have been talking with my students about the integral role that writing plays in building community and practicing democracy. Our discussions have followed the mapping exercise I described in my last blog en...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • Curing the “Grading All the Things” Blues

      We’re at that point in the semester when students are hitting Maximum Anxiety about Grades. The corollary for instructors is Maximum Anxiety about Grading All The Things. Here’s a cure for both ill...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • Writing, Rhetoric, and Activism

      I have been talking with my students about the school shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School last month, and we have discussed and debated the rhetoric around the murder of 17 students and educators – ...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene
  • Discuss Student Debt in our Writing Classes? Our Students Can’t Afford for Us Not To

      Economics has risen above its reputation as the "dismal science,” but it still may not seem like a lively topic for a composition classroom. However, in the spirit of inviting our students to grapple wit...
    April Lidinsky
    last modified by April Lidinsky
  • The Power of Image and Text

      I often discuss with students the rhetorical power of using both images and text to help readers understand the nature and stakes of a given problem, and to move readers to action. Civil rights activists have ...
    Stuart Greene
    last modified by Stuart Greene